If you want to share files between cloud desktops within the same workspace, you can create an Apsara File Storage NAS (NAS) file system for the workspace. Then, the NAS file system is automatically mounted to the cloud desktops to implement file sharing. This topic describes how to create a NAS file system.

Prerequisites

Apsara File Storage NAS is activated in the NAS console.

Background information

Elastic Desktop Service (EDS) provides the shared storage feature by using Apsara File Storage NAS. You can create a NAS file system for each workspace so that cloud desktops within the workspace can share files. When you create a NAS file system, a general-purpose NAS file system is automatically created and a default mount target is generated. For more information, see General-purpose NAS file systems.
Note If you want to create multiple NAS file systems within a workspace, submit a ticket.

You are charged for the NAS file system on a pay-as-you-go basis. The settlement cycle of used storage is 1 hour, and bills are generated within one hour of the end of each settlement cycle. You can also purchase storage plans to offset the bills for the used storage of NAS file systems. For more information, see Billing overview of General-purpose NAS.

Procedure

  1. Log on to the EDS console.
  2. In the top navigation bar, select a region.
  3. In the left-side navigation pane, choose Resources > Apsara File Storage NAS.
  4. On the Shared Storage NAS page, click Create shared storage NAS.
  5. Set parameters for the NAS file system.
    1. Enter the name and description, and select a workspace.
    2. Select a storage type.
      The general-purpose NAS file systems are classified into Capacity and Performance types. The following list describes the default settings that are used to create a NAS file system:
      • Capacity: uses the Server Message Block (SMB) protocol and has a capacity of 10 PiB.
      • Performance: uses the SMB protocol and has a capacity of 1 PiB.

      The file systems of Capacity NAS and Performance NAS differ in performance metrics. For more information, see General-purpose NAS file systems.

  6. Click OK.

Result

After the NAS file system is created, you can view it on the Shared Storage NAS page. If the status of the file system changes to Started, the NAS file system is created, and a default mount target is generated. You can click Management in the Actions column to go to the NAS console and view the details of the NAS file system.

Cloud desktops within the selected workspace can share this NAS file system. When you create, start, restart, or recreate a cloud desktop within the workspace, the system mounts the NAS file system to the cloud desktop. You can use the following methods to log on to the cloud desktop and check whether you can access the NAS file system:

  • For Windows cloud desktops, the NAS file system is mounted to drive Z by default. If drive Z already exists, or if multiple NAS file systems are mounted to drive Z, the NAS file system is mounted to the next drive in reverse alphabetic order. For example, if drive Z already exists, the NAS file system is mounted to drive Y. If drive Y already exists, the NAS file system is mounted to drive X.
    Note If the NAS file system is created in an Active Directory (AD) workspace and the NAS file system has the SMB access control list (ACL) feature enabled, the NAS file system is automatically mounted as a domain user.
  • For Linux cloud desktops, the NAS file system is mounted to the /share/nas/0 directory by default. If multiple NAS file systems are mounted to this directory, the NAS file system is mounted to a directory in numerical order, such as /share/nas/1.
    Note When a NAS file system is automatically mounted to a Linux cloud desktop, the NAS file system can only be anonymously mounted. If the workspace to which the Linux cloud desktop belongs is an AD workspace, and you want to enable the SMB ACL feature for a NAS file system, you must mount the NAS file system. For more information, see Manually mount a NAS file system to a Linux cloud desktop.

What to do next

If a NAS file system is created in an AD workspace and the NAS file system has the SMB ACL feature enabled, you can join the mount target of the NAS file system to the AD domain to authenticate user identities and perform file-level access control as an AD domain user. For more information about how to configure AD and how to join the mount target of a NAS file system that has the SMB ACL feature enabled to an AD domain, see Configure access control rules.
Note For Windows cloud desktops, NAS file systems can be automatically mounted as domain users. For Linux cloud desktops, NAS file systems can only be mounted anonymously when they are automatically mounted. To mount NAS file systems as a domain user, you must manually mount them. For more information, see Manually mount a NAS file system to a Linux cloud desktop.