You can use a variety of methods to connect to an Elastic Compute Service (ECS) instance,such as Virtual Network Computing (VNC) and third-party client tools. Choose a method to connect to your instance based on the operating system of your instance, the operating system of your device, and the operations that you want to perform.

Connection methods

Operating system of your instance Operating system of your device Connection method
Linux Windows
UNIX-like operating systems such as Linux and macOS
Operating systems of mobile devices, such as iOS and Android Apps such as SSH Control Lite and JuiceSSH

For more information, see Connect to a Linux instance from a mobile device.

Windows Windows
Linux
macOS
Operating systems of mobile devices, such as iOS and Android Apps such as Microsoft Remote Desktop

For more information, see Connect to a Windows instance from a mobile device.

Note
  • Except for VNC, all other connection tools require that instances have public IP addresses or elastic IP addresses (EIPs) assigned.
  • After a Windows instance is created, it takes 2 to 3 minutes to initialize the operating system. Do not restart the instance while it is being initialized. After a non-I/O optimized Windows instance is created, it takes 10 minutes to initialize the operating system. Do not connect to the instance while it is being initialized.

Comparison of connection tools

The following table describes the advantages of VNC and other third-party client tools.

Item VNC Third-party client tool
Assignment of a public IP address or an EIP to the instance Optional. VNC can be used to troubleshoot network configuration exceptions, such as firewalls being enabled by mistake. Required.
Enabling services such as SSH on the instance Optional. VNC can be used to troubleshoot SSH service exceptions, such as SSHD being disabled. Required.
Logons by using the ECS console Supported. Not supported. The local client must be installed.
Independence of the instance operating system VNC can be used to connect to both Linux and Windows instances. Depends on the client tool. The third-party client tools can be used to connect to Linux or Windows instances.
Simultaneous logons by multiple operating system users to a single instance Not supported. Depends on the client tool.
Ease of interaction VNC does not allow you to copy or paste text. To copy or paste text, use the feature for copying long commands. Depends on the client tool.
Visually viewing Linux system file resources Not supported. Depends on the client tool.
Permissions to control and modify hardware Supported. VNC can be used to manage resources such as BIOS and troubleshoot exceptions such as system startup failures. Not supported.
Terminal configurability Not supported. Supported, but detailed capabilities vary based on the client tool.